People avoiding talk about corona virus because scared?

In the last several days, with numerous different people, whenever I turned the topic to talking about the Corona virus, they start refusing to respond. Are people really that afraid of it right now where they're afraid to even talk about it for two seconds? Also, really funny bad attitudes have seemed to have gotten noticably worse in just the last couple of weeks, that also because of the virus? Is it really that much of a deadly outbreak kinda thing where it's fucking everybody's heads up like this?

Is It Normal?
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  • I think people have reached saturation point...it's on everyone's mind and honestly, beyond any further developments, it's just the same conversation over and over...any conversation outside of it is eagerly sought. I know I hate to be the person who brings it up...

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    • I understand. I'm about ready also to shut it out of my mind and refuse to talk about it with people I see when I go out. Even though I wrote this post because I had been thinking about it so much, worrying like crazy about it. But I think right now I'm going to finally stop thinking about it for a while because it's not helping me in the slightest and just driving me crazy

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      • That's understandable. Worry is a natural reaction. It's just a shame so few people can be sensible about it. Both ends of the spectrum make me embarrassed to be human.

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        • That's the word, "sensible", that's lacking in today's world

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  • There's a lot to unpack about a Pandemic. There's the illness itself, the massive economic downfall and the changes that brings, the monstrosity of misinformation and lack of information, and all of the different perspectives of how people should be handling situations both publicly and privately in the midst of abrupt changes. Even if the situation doesn't improve, once we get our bearings we will adapt.

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    • I sure hope so. Good answer though.

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  • I love my neighborhood. Neighbors are putting signs in their windows to say hello, passing out chalk to color the street, and checking in. Most people I pass while walking the dog check in to make sure I am still sane. We wave from the other side of the street and say hello. And all conversations have been indirectly about the virus. Mostly, people are being kind. I am so glad I moved here a few years ago. My last home would have been awful to quarantine in.

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  • PSA:
    Please spread this info to anyone looking for accurate information on Covid-19.

    Coronavirus short version:
    https://youtu.be/DfMl6W6N7-A
    Coronavirus long version:
    https://youtu.be/E3URhJx0NSw
    Websites::
    CDC:
    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/cases-updates/cases-in-us.html
    WHO:
    https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus

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  • People are frustrated.
    It gets tiring, things are shutting down left and right, it is a pain to even find basic groceries, and the public is worn out from it.

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    • Thats a shame, I was at walmart yesterday and only thing I struggled to find was brown sugar, buttermilk and cinnamon. They are hoarding cinnamon for fuck sakes! Oh yea the flour was all but gone. Only 3 bags left. I wanted 2 bags but like I can get by with only 1. Freaking people.

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      • Yes, I saw several customers in line at store today with carts overflowing, like they literally had about 2 months worth of food, as if literally everything will be gone from the stores very shorty.

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        • That's ridiculous. I went there for baking supplies. Like peools there wont be a shortage if you just kuve life as normal.

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          • I guess that they're so afraid that there'll be nothing left at the stores at all in a couple of weeks, so they're thinking that at least they'll be stocked up at home.

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    • Yes. That makes sense. I guess that they're trying to shut it out so the topic doesn't worry them sick. So they're not sick on top of being sick.

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  • No it’s just cause it’s really fucking boring and tedious. So much ridiculous hysteria.

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  • I am tired of hearing about it but I don't want to die from that shit, so I look for info.

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  • I think people are just sick of having the same conversation over and over again.

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    • That's true. And we've all been hearing about the Corona nonstop for a while now

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      • Yeah, it's been all anyone wants to talk about for weeks, all sharing the same dumb misinformation and scaring each other. Im just talking from my own perspective, personally I got really bored with it a long time ago. Nobody's seen a movie or heard a new album lately?

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  • No u

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  • I’m honestly mostly concerned about people’s sanity. I stocked up on food just bc I have kids. And got ammo bc I’m more concerned about the aftermath. I haven’t heard of anyone who even knows anyone whose gotten sick. Anyone?

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    • I don't know anyone who has it either. But you're right about the sanity thing, the way many people are acting now is a long way from civilized or considerate. Rudeness has noticably been on the rise. Correct me if I'm mistaken.

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    • Not directly, but my podiatrist knows someone who had it. Luckily, she recovered. Based in Singapore.

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  • People are fearful, and that emotion triggers different responses. Some people don't really understand what's happening and have slipped into a state of apocalyptic panic. Others are obsessively interested in what's going down because understanding a situation allows them to regain some sense of control. Still others have gone into denial and either refuse to even think about what's happening or they spend their time in social media echo chambers with other deniers.

    The hoarding isn't logical, since nowhere is in such a dire state that chickens have stopped laying eggs, all the silos full of grain and warehouses full of flour have burned down, the toilet paper factories have been shut and the delivery networks connecting producers with consumers have collapsed. But for some people, having an attic stuffed full with toilet paper is enough to give them an illusory sense of having done something concrete against an invisible threat.

    It's clear that the complex networks which provide food and consumable goods are under a lot of stress at the moment. I've seen reports of supermarket managers in the UK saying that what they're seeing is like pre-Christmas shopping levels being sustained for a couple of weeks now. As well as shelves in supermarkets being stripped as soon as they're filled, I'm sure that lots of workers no longer eating at places near their job and people no longer going out to eat is going to cause disruption simply because the supply chains have to adjust to a new normal.

    But most people have a finite amount of space to store stuff and a limited amount of money, and it's not like the virus is making everyone eat three times as much as they normally do (or use more TP than they normally do), so we have to be getting close to a point where what people buy returns to something close to normal.

    It seems to me that what this whole situation highlights is how many people are totally unprepared for any sort of social or economic disruption because they have been working under the assumption that the magic of free-market capitalism means they'll always be able to buy whatever they need whenever they need it. I know lots of people find it a challenge to put food on their family dining table from day to day, and I'd never criticise them for not having any sort of buffer stored away. But for those of us who are better-off, there's no excuse for not having at least a couple of weeks worth of long shelf-life staples on hand.

    It seems to me that one lesson many people could learn from all this is that they should pay more attention to what's in their cupboards, get out of the habit of buying what they need only as they need it and try to always maintain a personal stockpile of enough food and hygiene supplies to get them through two or three weeks. Prepping to the extent that Mormons do with a year's supply of food socked away seems to me excessive (and stock-control is a hassle since you have to ensure that stored food is used and replaced before it goes bad), but it's not difficult to get into the habit of looking out for discount offers in supermarkets on stuff you'd use anyway, buy more than you immediately need of at least a couple of items on each visit to the shops and try to keep a rotating supply of tinned and dried food on hand at all times.

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    • That's all fine, Booj, but just a couple of things. Firstly, the 7% daily growth rate would indicate that roughly half of the UK population will eventually get infected. Plus, the collapse of world stock markets would seem say prices are appropriate for an aggregate infection curve that will not stay flattened long enough for care to all critical patients.

      It's 130 days until August, and 1.07^130 doesn't look pretty. Of course, the spread will slow after more of the infected population has recovered, and consequently cannot get reinfected.

      We basically have a decision to make right now. Do we buy a 50 kg bag of flour today, or contract an almost certain infection buying it this summer? The answer for a 70 year old is different than it is for a 20 year old. Hopefully, you know a 20 year old who can go to the store for you when the worst has arrived. (I'm hoping for a counter-response here. Your intelligence and deeper awareness of general situations is a positive influence on all of us.)

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  • I would talk about it more but it seems I am the only survivor left around my parts. Haha, for real tho, I work alone, we are down to 3 essential employees, the school is closed and I just don't ever see anyone really.

    It's spooky. At least I have an entire school full of toilet paper if it comes to that.

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