Is it normal to think the word cute is cringe?

You can disagree with me, hate me if you want but I find the word to be quite cringe I just hate that word so much that I just can't stand hearing that word maybe it's me just being a person who no longer tolerates that word. Everytime I hear that word I want to lose it and punch someone who says that word.

Bottom line is the word is cringe in my opinion but knowing someone on here will probably get butthurt about this opinion.

Is It Normal?
Help us keep this site organized and clean. Thanks!
[ Report Post ]
Comments ( 44 ) Sort: best | oldest
  • Kawaii?

    Comment Hidden ( show )
      -
    • ^ this is cringe

      Comment Hidden ( show )
        -
      • That's kind of the point. XD

        Comment Hidden ( show )
      • To be fair it's taken from the Japanese word of cute. A rose by any another name is just as sweet.

        I dont think its cringe. You are just simply not using an english word. You are using the word for what the word is made for.

        Comment Hidden ( show )
    • Reminds me of that godawful Japanese Avril Lavinge song.

      Comment Hidden ( show )
        -
      • I remember that song. The opening lyrics of "mom's not home tonight, so we can roll around, have a pillow fight. Like, a major rager OMFG" made me wonder why someone whose almost 30 would be concerned about that. The song is quite awful, but also catchy. XD

        Comment Hidden ( show )
          -
        • And the line about wanting to roll around in their underwear together. I remember hearing my friend reading the lyrics and asking her if Avril was inviting hello kitty to have an orgy. An iconically bad song and you’re right, the fact she was nearly 30 at the time just makes it worse.

          Comment Hidden ( show )
    • 😋

      Comment Hidden ( show )
  • Cats are cute.😼

    Comment Hidden ( show )
  • Cringe is never cute and is always cringe

    Comment Hidden ( show )
  • I think the word cringe is cringe

    Comment Hidden ( show )
  • The word cringe is a verb.

    Every time I see or hear someone use it as an adjective I want to lose it and punch them in the face.

    Comment Hidden ( show )
      -
    • Hell yeah!

      Comment Hidden ( show )
    • Your linguistic purism does not help anyone. Language evolves; that is the way of nature.

      Comment Hidden ( show )
        -
      • I do not care to contribute to de-evolution or the dumbing down process regardless of whether or not it's considered fashionable.

        Comment Hidden ( show )
          -
        • I agree. While english is a bastard of a language system at least it can add new words on the fly.

          Changing what words mean is a big no no. Changing how it's used is stupid.

          We all have a ability to write English here. At least use it correctly.

          Comment Hidden ( show )
        • I believe that the removal of "ye" from English is a "dumbing down", but you don't see me going around using it or, worse, insisting that others use it.

          Comment Hidden ( show )
            -
          • Would should bring back Old English..
            Also I would love to see some drunk guy stumbling home from a bar in his beer-stained underwear yelling at passersby "Ye ought not speak in thine heathen tongue! Use ye thy goodly speech!"

            Comment Hidden ( show )
              -
            • Old English wouldn't use those words at all. Early Modern English, on the other hand, would use those words. However, it would be "Ye ought not ſpeake in your heathen tongue! Uſe ye your goodlie ſpeache."

              Or, in the singular, "Thou ought not ſpeake in thine heathen tongue! Uſe thou thy goodlie ſpeache."

              Comment Hidden ( show )
          • No one is talking about bringing back "ye" into common usage.

            Using cringe as a noun is a trendy equivalent of words or phrases such as "groovy", "Dyn-o-mite!", Jive Turkey, Turkey,etc... Basically ways to say "Look at me, I'm a dufus hipster."

            In the future, looking back at someone using cringe as a noun will itself be cringe worthy.

            Comment Hidden ( show )
              -
            • Notice, however, that "groovy" is still considered an adjective to this day, and people still understand it, despite the fact that it is considered "outdated". "Dyn-o-mite" was simply a tv show reference. People can reference tv shows all they want.

              It will not be cringe-worthy; it will simply be outdated.

              Comment Hidden ( show )
      • Language isnt an overflowing and shifting state. It remains 99% the same year to year.

        People who use words wrong deserve to be criticized for it. Only when enough people use it commonly will the change be amended in its use.

        Montemetcalfe is right to dislike someone for using words in the wrong context.

        If you change what words mean you can radically change what some laws are even for.

        Comment Hidden ( show )
          -
        • If you feel the need to criticize people for using words "wrong", then perhaps you should learn the technically correct phrasing for the statement, as the word "wrong" is not an adverb.

          Natural language changes heavily over time, as your "misuse" of the word "wrong" shows. If people decide that they want to use a word in a certain way, it is no problem of anyone's that they do so, unless it results in blatant miscommunication.

          Everyone understands exactly what is meant when someone uses "cringe" as an adjective. There is no issue with it.

          Laws changing perceived meaning is not an issue of language evolution; it is an issue of laws being written in actively spoken languages. It is in part for this reason that the Church still proclaims all of her laws in Latin, since it is a dead language; it does not change. A living language is bound to change, and if a law is so worded that it is changed in meaning by a change in language, it is up to the lawmakers to either write their laws in the ancient version of the language (since it does not change, as it is dead) or to rewrite their laws in modern language, so that they may be correctly understood.

          Comment Hidden ( show )
            -
          • Are you the original poster?
            If you are you should be the one to talk! You're upset with people using an established word and meaning. How cute.

            Comment Hidden ( show )
              -
            • I am not the original poster. I haven't posted on here since I first joined, and I'm fairly certain it will stay that way.

              Comment Hidden ( show )
      • Lexicographers typically wait to add a word to our dictionary until they've determined that it has met these criteria: It has relatively widespread use. It has a widely agreed-upon meaning. It seems to have staying power—meaning it's likely to be used for a long time. -Dictionary.com

        If the word ain't can become a word from widespread usage then the word cringe can change too. Besides when has slang ever followed proper linguistics?

        Comment Hidden ( show )
  • In what context is it cringe?

    Comment Hidden ( show )
  • Smol

    Comment Hidden ( show )
  • Awww thats adorable

    Comment Hidden ( show )
  • CUTE RAWKS!!! 😋👍🏻

    Comment Hidden ( show )
  • Cringe is more cringe than cute.

    Comment Hidden ( show )
  • lol tbh no....i think its adorable and its sweet but i understand people feel different about words.

    Comment Hidden ( show )
  • Why do you feel that way?

    Comment Hidden ( show )
  • hates the word cringe but uses the word cringe to describe thier feelings for the word

    Comment Hidden ( show )
  • I almost agree. 'Cute' sounds more condescending than anything

    Comment Hidden ( show )
Add A Comment