Is it healthy to drink body armor daily?

Would it be healthy or acceptable to drink one 16 ounce bottle of Body Armor every day?

Secondly, hypothetically, what if one were to stop eating lettuce, milk, orange juice, fruit, and vegetables and received all those vitamins solely from Body Armor? Bad decision?

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  • According to Wikipedia, Body Armor is basically sugar water with a catchy name, a load of branding hype attached, and an inflated price tag.

    If you think it's a good idea to go on a low or nil fiber diet, then I suggest you do some reading on gut nutrition. I'm not saying it will immediately kill you, but it's not what our bodies evolved to deal with, and so it's not a brilliant idea.

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    • The nutrition label claims that you essentially get all of your daily vitamins in one bottle is why I ask. I think it has 36 g of sugar. I would still get fiber from other foods. I was almost worried that a bigger concern was getting too much of vitamins given that you're still going to accidentally get vitamins from other foods

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      • If you're healthy, your body generally disposes of unneeded vitamins without any problems. Which is why nutritionists say that for anyone who has a healthy, balanced diet, all taking supplements does is create very expensive piss.

        The only exceptions I'm aware of are megadoses of vitamins A, C, zinc and selenium.

        And that's the other thing: you don't only need vitamins, we all need to consume a range of minerals for our bodies to function properly.

        You say Body Armor has 36 grams of sugar. Is that per 100 ml? If so, that means it's roughly one-third sugar. Go get a mug, fill it a third full with sugar, then add water to the top. That's what Body Armor basically is.

        Then go read up on the history of obesity (and it's related problems such as Type 2 Diatbetes) over the last 50 years. There's a direct link between increased levels of obesity and increased levels of sugar (particularly high-fructose corn syrup) in processed foods, and clear evidence that agribusiness systematically demonised fat in order to increase sugar consumption. (Richard Nixon is partly responsible, which is kinda amusing.) I'm not one of those cranks who believes white sugar is toxic, but our bodies did not evolve in an environment where pure sucrose was readily available, and lots of us are paying the price for that.

        https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/aug/15/age-of-obesity-shaming-overweight-people

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        • Thank you for the well thought out comment. For a few weeks, I was drinking a bottle each day. I've changed to a bit of a more practical approach...greens, OJ, and milk or almond milk and then maybe an occasional Body Armor

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  • I didn't even knew what body armor was, until I googled it... I doubt a sugary sports drink has any real nutrients... Stick to your regular diet. Redbull doesn't make you fly, doubt bodyarmor feeds you. XD

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  • Be a man. Drink ArmorAll.

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    • Real men drink WD-40! I get drunk on the stuff on a regular basis XD

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    • Great idea. I'll have to after using this site of negative life-hating people

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  • I had a crusade in my mind when I read this.

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  • Body Armor doesn't contain that much vitamins or electrolytes. A 16 oz bottle will give you enough vitamin A and C, but that's it. You still need vitamins B, D, E, and K. Also 16 oz will only give you about 20% of your recommended daily intake of potassium which you won't get if you cut out fruits and vegetables from your diet. Body Armor is a sports drink and as such it is meant to help replenish electrolytes lost through sweat while doing exercise. It is not meant to be used as replacement for eating fruits and vegetables.

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    • That was my mistake. It claims to provide 100 percent of Vitamins A, C, and E. Not ALL vitamins. So you would say it is an unhealthy means of satisfying those 3 vitamin needs? If so, what is it that is bad about it? A specific ingredient(s)?

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      • Vitamins A and E are fat soluble vitamins. With that you have to be careful with the amount you take in because unlike water soluble vitamins like vitamin C and some types of vitamin B your body can't just get rid of them through urination. Taking in too much of any type of vitamin can lead to hypervitaminosis, which depending on which vitamin you take too much of can cause different negative effects. Reaching a toxic level of vitamin E is rare.

        A lot of foods are fortified with vitamins which would increase your chances of getting too much vitamins A or E since you are drinking 100% of your daily intake in just the 16 oz of Body Armor. Also a lot of other foods that you would need to get your other nutrients not in Body Armor would have vitamins A and E making you at even a higher risk.

        In short, Body Armor isn't in of itself isn't dangerous. It's just that with relying on it for your vitamin A and E you have to be more careful with other foods you take in so you don't reach a toxic level.

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  • It works surprisingly well for a massive hangover but I wouldn't call it healthy.

    If you are ok to die at 60 then go for it. It isn't cheap tho.

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