I find electronic devices repairers contradictory

Their repair shops are filled with 'dead' electronic devices and appliances which is testament that they failed to repair them. Yet, they never get rid of them from their shops.

My reasoning is that if indeed they were competent at doing their job, then there would be less or no unrepaired junk in their shops, right? And why do they carry on with exhibiting them in the first place?! Should medical practitioners keep corpses in their clinics too?

I know I'm going overboard with this but, yes, it makes no sense to me.

Is It Normal?
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  • It's an amusing perspective, but I suspect the "corpses" are kept because it's not like literally everything inside them is fried.

    It's possible that what you've seen is hoarding, or maybe the repair people just like the looks of the things and can't bear the thought of chucking them in a dumpster. But if you're talking about older electronic devices and appliances, finding new replacements for malfunctioning individual components and circuit boards can be impossible since the manufacturer won't still have them in stock.

    So, to use your analogy, what you see is more like a science fiction scenario where facilities keep the bodies of people who have died in suspended animation so their undamaged organs can be transplanted as and when required.

    Of course, these days, canny electronic and appliance repair people will disassemble old products and list the still-functional parts on ebay.

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  • They just ship em to brazil where someone in the favelas repairs them and sells them in his shop. Im serious.

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    • Hah! That's not really how a favela works.

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      • Naw look into it Brazil has tariffs that make iphones more expensive there than anywhere in the world they have gangs that steal phones in the USA and ship them to brazil. I saw some news stories about it

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  • Along with using them as parts donors; they also keep unreliable items to practice and train on...

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  • In repair shops where I am, they seem to take in phones, set a maximum collection period of 3 months, then sell off the phones the phones that haven't been collected by then, as reconditioned. All the parts and 'phone corpses' are kept in a workshop out back.

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  • Anything is fixable. It's a matter of how much effort is needed. In high-paying countries it's counterproductive to fix them.

    Moreover, those guys could suddenly find a capacitor they can salvage from that dead electronic device.

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  • A friend of mine used to manage one of these places. Pretty shady business if you ask me. He said the technicians learned real-time how to do the repairs, by looking it up on YouTube. And often they would break things on accident and have to lie and put it on the customer. Like hundreds of dollars for a phone that the technicians broke and still have to pay the service. They'd tell the customer it was broken before they touched it and there's nothing they can do. So you'd just get handed back a broken phone and a bill.

    I can't say if recommend their services lol.. at least this one place, but it is a chain of stores..

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  • obsolete devices or no parts available or not financially feasible to fix or traded in exchange or just plain fucked

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  • Maybe if they can't fix your junk you at least you had the wall of evidence on why you shouldn't have gotten your hopes up

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