Do you believe in aliens?

I vote hell yes! The universe is a big place

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  • Yes and they're crossing our border.

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  • Nope I do not, but I kinda do now since we have an orange one with yellow cotton candy for hair in the white house.

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  • Being a Christian, I used to think for certain that aliens did not exist because there was no mention of them in the Bible.

    However, nowadays I entertain the possibility that there could be no mention of life outside of Earth because it isn't relevant to humans' relationship with God. The God of the Bible is the God of the universe, so he could also be the God of another book for other planets and sapient species for all I know. Hopefully none of that was blasphemous.

    Also, if I viewed things from an atheist and evolutionist perspective, I would find the possibility of life forms on other planets with intelligence greater than or equal to humans' to be highly probable.

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  • I can't say I believe in little green men, but I often wonder if there's some earth-like planet waaaaaaay out in an undiscovered part of the universe, and maybe the inhabitants are wondering the same thing about us.

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  • Almost without a doubt and most other scientists agree.

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    • Yes, of course, but it begs the question of "the great filter" (Fermi Paradox). And, if the Drake equation is grossly overestimating life in the galaxy, don't we Earthlings have the duty to colonize exo-planets, and moons with GMO bacteria specially customized to each environment? And, wouldn't it be fun to colonize the cool cloud tops of Venus with floating green bacteria thusly changing our close sister planet into cosmic graffiti?

      I published these ideas in an editorial in the One-in-a-Thousand Society (OATHS) newsletter about 5 years ago. I only qualify for Mensa, but I believe some of these geniuses interested in astrobiology, have since been working on the initiative I suggested. I believe it is a human imperative to continue abiogenesis. This effort stems from Charles Darwin's implied claim that all life depends on other life, so the natural selection process will breed ecosystems. As a result, life will eventually fill all voids. Please share your thoughts with us. A fine mind like yours is needed for this issue.

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      • The elusive Great Filter is only one potential solution to the Fermi paradox. I'm less inclined to subscribe to hypotheses widely prohibiting abiogenesis, subsequent development of intelligence coupled with anatomical means of utilizing said intelligence, or circumvention of apocalyptic scenarios erroneously judged to be absolute inevitabilities.

        My own suspicions require a preface. Humans share roughly 18% of their genetic information with plants, 92% with all mammals, and as much as 99% with chimpanzees. While it's tempting to assert that the variance regards particularly critical genes, the incontrovertible reality is that the difference between the intelligence of the two animals is negligible and that human accomplishments and structures apparently contradicting that are in fact imperceptibly superior to impoundments constructed by beavers when viewed from further along the progression of intelligence.

        Constantly confronted with the apparently bizarre and counterintuitive realm of quantum mechanics, the thought that humans are simply little more equipped to fully understand the universe than a chimpanzee is increasingly pervasive in my mind as an explanation for the peculiarities thereof. When humans search for intelligent extraterrestrial life, their speculations revolve around the Kardashev scale, which traditionally categorizes civilizations based on the extent of their ability to harness and manipulate energy. Humans are humble enough to admit they do not yet even rank on the scale, but unintentionally too arrogant to often consider that the scale was devised by said humans and quite possibly doesn't accurately describe the goals and motivations of higher intelligence.

        Experiments such as the Miller-Urey experiment have demonstrated that amino acids form naturally. It's increasingly apparent that biology may be as natural of an expression of chemistry as chemistry is of physics. When this line of thinking is augmented with consideration of alternative-chirality biomolecules, consequent "anti-chiral" life utilizing D amino acids or L sugars, and even the possibility of non-carbon-based biochemistries such as those based on silicon and germanium, it becomes conceivable that the Drake equation actually offers an underestimation. Carl Sagan similarly coined bias against this line of thinking "carbon chauvinism" but we're in agreement that carbon-based life is likely the most common due to the chemical versatility and abundance of the element.

        This reasoning paired with the prodigious nature of the universe indicates little to no room for the possibility that intelligence doesn't flourish here. Where is it? Humans likely don't know what to look for. It's unlikely that a species masters interstellar travel before reaching a technological singularity, a point after which speculation is nearly impossible. Indeed, humans seem much closer to reaching their own than to developing efficient interstellar travel independently. An intelligence perhaps both biologically and artificially redesigned from the ground up for maximum efficiency likely has motivations far beyond current human conceptualization altogether. I suspect its actions would be indistinguishable from nature from the human perspective or undetectable, extradimensional in its spatial and temporal qualities. That's if the usual protocol isn't to immediately outright escape the universe itself, possibly even in favor of designer universes tweaked to their preferences. After all, many of us have proposed eventually doing this anyway as a means of escaping the heat death of the universe, also known as the Big Freeze.

        My conclusion is that extraterrestrial life existing in the intelligence range we generally propose is rare, that the natural gap between human-level intelligence and the next level is sufficient to render said level incomprehensible to humans, but that simpler life, microbial and beyond, is abundant and very detectable. The upcoming James Webb Space Telescope will be able to detect atmospheric chemical disequilibrium, determining whether or not atmospheres of planets orbiting nearby stars are being modified by life.

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        • Your response is loaded with good material that I wish I could find on subreddits r/Panspermia, r/GreatFilter, r/Abiogenesis, r/Terraforming, and the lot. As I read this my intuition keeps lifting the idea of the pyramid of life into my thoughts. That's because, I believe the pyramid of life touches upon most of the stuff you have said.

          Firstly, it's a no brainer that we would not know how to detect life more intelligent than ourselves. These civilizations would likely be too intelligent to radiate energy to Kardeshev magnitudes anyway. The Kardeshev scale is just wishful thinking to anyone with a good telescope. Similarly, atmospheric testing of nuclear warheads at the beginning of the arms race was shamefully ignorant. Humans should have known that the energy sent out into space would only announce our location as prey to alien predators.

          This means we should be looking for the bottom tier of the pyramid of life because it indicates there may be tiers built on top of it. Finally, the James Webb telescope will do what should have been done thirty years ago.

          The pyramid of life also raises the importance of panspermia and lowers the importance of abiogenesis. Our carbon chauvinism works in our favor for terraforming other worlds with customized GMO microbes by creating the lowest level of the pyramid. Indeed Carl Sagan had a wonderful idea about "sinkers and floaters" because cool cloud tops of many exoplanets similar to Venus are the best entry points to introduce life. Colonizing Mars as it is, with out engineering some kind of sustainable pyramid of life first is both difficult and counter productive, IMHO.

          I think the Great Filter is a gross oversimplification. Great extinctions come and go. Humans are causing the fifth one, and really don't care. Our primate inability to regulate the "don't give a fuck" response is so bred into our genes that nothing can be done. Our own global warming will destroy most of the pyramid of life upon which we depend. This is good. After a century of barbarian survivalism, perhaps the human population will drop to something manageable like 250,000,000. Hopefully, these people can rise above the sixth great extinction (from whatever source) and start building upon a hopefully thriving first tier of a panspermatic created pyramid so as to continue with terraforming for eventual colonization.

          The Big Freeze is so far away that even Kardeshev probably doesn't give a shit. But, it prompts one's curiosity to read
          S. W. Hawking, T. Hertog; A Smooth Exit from Eternal Inflation; 20 Apr 2018.
          https://arxiv.org/pdf/1707.07702.pdf

          Those long wavelength gravity waves may bring back a serious reconsideration of the Big Bounce from its current academic disfavor with a few unexpected twists.

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          Executive summary: McBean says the pyramid of life is a concept with rich consequences affecting a variety of topics of special interest to astronomers and cosmologists.

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      • Drake and Fermi forgot to add time to their equations.

        Given an eternity or even just billions of years, the odds that two intellegent societies exist at any given same time in the universe is (forgive the pun) astronomically unlikely.

        On earth we have gone through several great dyings in only thousands or millions of years.

        The odds are not likely aliens exist at the same time as us.

        Life, most likely. Intelligent life, doubtful.

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        • Contrary to popular belief, the Drake equation actually does include time: The seventh parameter, L, denotes the amount of time that a civilization chooses to or is able to broadcast. Due to the fact that it's very likely that at least some civilizations reach a point at which they're consistently able to avert disaster, many of us propose replacing L with fIC • T where fIC is the fraction of civilizations effectively obtaining immortality and T is how long this has been occurring, some fraction of the age of the universe.

          Your assertion that many if not most civilizations will die is absolutely correct but only before reaching a certain point. It's likely that the position of Jupiter and our disproportionately large moon saved us from a lot of things, but similar configurations can and do exist.

          For a more detailed look at my views, see my reply to McBean.

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        • Good point about time. Also, an intelligent species less social than humans may feel safer cloaking or camouflaging their civilization as well. Neither Fermi, nor Drake have parameters for that possibility either.

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  • Yeah somewhere but they're probably just as clueless as we are.

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  • I don't believe that aliens have ever visited Earth, but I do believe that there is life somewhere out there besides Earth, somewhere in the vast universe.

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  • If there is any (& if the're intelligent) then the're more then likely not in our galaxy or we would have come across each other by now (unless they just don't give a shit about us that is), but than again there's always the case they haven't invented space travel yet. But that would imply that the're either fairly new (or as stupid as we are) or their planet doesn't have the materials to allow it.

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  • No I don't. No evidence for them thusfar and I feel like we would know already if there was any. Basically I think there would either be a lot of aliens, or just earth. And since we haven't found any yet I reckon its the latter.

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    • Did it ever occur to you, we are imbiciles. We can't even talk to other life on THIS planet. Why bother even looking for life elsewhere.

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      • I have thought about that, however my view of the human race on the whole is not as negative as yours appears to be. And I don't think we are looking for life to be friends with them, I think its the mystery of it all thats appealing.

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  • Yes but I hope the pleiadians are the real aliens, not those goofy bug eyed looking ones.

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  • They probed my anus! They are definitely real, god damn fuckers didn't even use lube!

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  • I hope so, I could do with an anal probe.


    Laughs in abstinence.

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  • Anyone who said 'nah' is an idiot

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  • I do..the chances are very high and I say very soon we will meet them indeed.

    I am not a science person but I have studied astroscience during my college time.The theories say the universe is shrinking into a single point ,say singularity, it takes time..but it will happen.After that another big bang will happen and the universe will shrink back to this singularity.In between them,life will be formed in universe under right circumstance at different levels, at different spacial bodies.

    But I doubt in their appearances and capabilities.May be they are strong or weaker than us.It all depends upon the characteristics of their home.

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  • Whatever is in fiction is always fictitious... or is it not always. Whatever them aliens is fake as hell.

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  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXB9823Qg9E
    This proves there is life on Mars at least.

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  • Dot123

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  • Maybe

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  • We obviously don’t know everything, there might be even other universes, parralel universes, dimensions and such. Even in our own universe we have a lot of things unknown to us and we always make the same mistakes as to saying this and that isn’t possible.

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  • Yes and we shouldn't be looking for them to make contact. Just to keep tabs on.

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  • Alien life was found on the International Space Station back in 2017, and yes it was a small microscopic bacteria which had adapted to the vacuum of space.

    To answer your question, space is constantly expanding thousands of times over I'd be extremely surprised if unidentified larger multi-celled life forms existed.

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    • Are you sure it just wasnt an earth bacteria that can handle the environment such as water bears.

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  • We're probably being manipulated by them behind the scenes.

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