Is it alright to deterrer from your own religion?

I'm beginning to believe that my religion is not what is real. I'm thinking that when you die, you get a full view of the galaxy, as you are given the option to roam the earth as a ghost, or try again in a new world where reality bends to your will. I'm concerned for myself.

Is It Normal?
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  • Hansberger?

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    • That post wasn't written by me this time, thanks anyway. However I can't believe in ghosts, is it any surprise I'm getting less and less likely to change my beliefs? I'm back to religious belief, I'm a Bolshevik like I was a year ago only a different branch of Bolshevism. I think one is to mediaevalistally believe in the forsaking of man and wife, father and mother and brethren and children, as it's repeated countless times in the Bible, passage after passage, and furthermore his beliefs in ghosts are to be given a critical examination and revaluation, as with all beliefs and assumptions, allowing the free opinions and will of my fellow men, yet to come from a place of absolute faith, and to return to the mediaeval attitude.

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  • Yes, think for yourself. That is good. I think politics and religion both breed brainwashing and crackpots.

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    • I think the unintelligent and the fools who think they're smarter or wiser than you are the ones who start the religions.

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  • Yes do it. Don't get brainwashed. I was in your same spot a few years ago and made the right choice!

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  • Yes, your beliefs in reality bending to your will are weird beliefs, I don't find them normal, and your beliefs beg the question. What you're believing may have been from some eccentric witch inventing his or her own divination or something like that, to make you believe weird shit, as a man I know in the facility I used to live in is now a Muslim because some eccentric preacher he calls his friend brainwashed him into it, so now he rejects gold! It's too easy to believe the first religion you see in books or from a friend by some eccentric man of charisma.

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  • Maybe you should leave your religion - at least temporarily - and explore your beliefs a bit?

    Your beliefs certainly sound “odd”, no offense (our universe is much larger than our galaxy by the way), and the whole “reality bends to your will” thing... I’m not sure what lead you to these conclusions, but you’re as entitled to your beliefs as anyone else.

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  • Yo! I was just thinking about that in the shower! Omg!

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  • Questioning the "truths" you were told as a kid is always a good thing. Unfortunately, these days it's very easy to find all sorts of crackpots and deluded fools who are very good at persuading people that their warped version of reality is true.

    The harsh fact is that none of us know what happens when we die. If you research Near Death Experiences, you'll find that people either report that they recall nothing at all or that their experience was - most often - positive and calm. I'm inclined to believe that when we die the lights go out and that's that, so I suspect that those pleasant memories of being dead - life-changing though they may be for those who experience them and return to the land of the living - are actually their memories of what happened as their brain shut down.

    The bottom line is that you can believe whatever the hell you want to on this topic. It may be contrary to what's written in some iron-age book or what some psychic may say, but that doesn't mean they're right and you're wrong. But nor does it mean that you're right and they're all wrong. At this point, it's all guess-work and wishful thinking for everyone. Believe whatever gives you comfort and helps you get through your life, but never believe that you have the right to tell anyone else how they should think about the meaning of life and what comes after.

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    • Also on near-death experiences, people who *do* see something might just be high on LSD - there's a study I read on this a while back.

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      • I guess you mean that LSD triggers an innate response of the brain that's similar to what some people report experiencing in an NDE. I haven't heard that theory before, but it seems plausible.

        The main thing I've got from reading reports of NDEs is that death usually isn't really a terrible experience, which is a comforting thought.

        The only niggling doubt I have about all this is why it's like that. I'm convinced that a huge factor in everything humans do is down to evolution, so why should death be a pleasant experience? The fundamental force at work in evolution is the drive of organisms to survive, so you'd think that a brain on the brink of death would be like a cornered rat desperately looking for a way out, rather than slipping into passive, trippy acceptance. It's been a long time since I read about NDEs, but my recollection is that panic and existential terror aren't very common.

        Maybe it's just a happy coincidence that the experience of the brain shutting down isn't unpleasant, but that seems a little odd to me.

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        • No, decaying of the brain releases LSD. Something of the sort. I'll look for it if you want me to.

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    • Well I am glad we agree what happens when we die. But now I am going to ask you a question and play devils advocate.

      Don't you think we should care what religion OP follows? Or any specific person for that matter? Many religious warp peoples view of the word to the point where I would argue its abuse.

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      • We're in agreement on that point as well.

        I think we should care about others' religious beliefs only when they have a direct impact on those who don't share those beliefs. If someone's deity is a toad that lives under a rock in their flowerbed, that's cool with me. I'll think they're a wingnut and that will colour my opinions of everything else they say and do, but they have the right to believe that. However, if they start droning on and on about their warty little god or they begin to get messages from the toad telling them that they should kill anyone who doesn't worship him, then they've crossed the line.

        If they have kids who are being brought up to believe that the toad is a god, that's just as abusive as parents who indoctrinate their children into any other religion. My philosophy on this is utilitarian: the most important question is if being raised in a religion restricts a person's ability to live a happy and fulfilled life where they are able to develop their full potential as a human being.

        My experience is that it's impossible to argue someone out of a religious belief. Either they look around the world, note how it doesn't match up with the dogma they were raised in and make the leap to rationality on their own, or they stay stuck in the paradigm they were raised in or converted to because it gives them some sort of comfort.

        Recently, I came across a quote that's often attributed to Jonathan Swift: "You cannot reason people out of positions they didn’t reason themselves into."

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        • True that. Nobody gets convinced by someone else to change religions. Also I would agree that raising kids more or less brainwashed by the parents religion is evil. And its tough because usually the parents intend well. I think the way Christianity forbids gay and premarital sex is ridiculous and feel really bad for people who are religiously brainwahsed that those things are evil. Needlessly depriving one self from sex is agonizing, I can tell you first hand.

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